Training Topics

Training Walk Ideas
Training Fatigue
Plan a Great Training Walk Route
Using Our Training Walk Search Tool
Start Your Training on the Right Foot

Training Walk Ideas

Training Fatigue
The 3-Day may seem like a long way off. If you've been training for a while now, you may be hitting a wall. Here are some tips to combat training fatigue:

Plan a Great Training Walk Route
As you begin your training walks, start out with easy walks (low mileage and on flat surfaces) and gradually increase difficulty. It is critical to train on all types of terrain over the months leading up to the 3-Day. Walking strictly on crushed limestone paths or dirt trails will not give your body a realistic expectation of walking on concrete or tar, for instance. If you’re planning a longer route, scout out available restroom and hydration stops.

Visit the Training Walk search page to find a 3-Day training walk near you. If you are having trouble finding a walk route, contact your local park district or community center for local path information. You can also use websites such as Google Map Pedometer (www.gmap-pedometer.com), www.mapmywalk.com or www.walkjogrun.net to determine how long your planned route is or find route ideas from other walkers.

Once you've found a great route, consider sharing it with your fellow participants and becoming a training walk leader. If you’d like to lead your own training walks, edit the interests in your online profile to check “I am interested in becoming a training walk leader.”

Using Our Training Walk Search Tool
As official 3-Day training walks get into full swing, here are some helpful hints:

Start Your Training on the Right Foot
Aristotle said, “Well begun is half done.” You can ensure your future training success by taking some key steps now. The first is getting the right equipment. Visit a 3-Day outfitter or another specialty running/walking shoe store. Ask the salesperson to analyze your gait and fit you with shoes designed for an endurance walking event. Once you find the perfect fit, you’ll want to buy two pairs of shoes, so you can alternate while training and won’t wear any one pair out. Click here for more shoe shopping tips.

Once you have the proper shoes, buy a pedometer (a simple model is very inexpensive) and measure how many steps you take during the course of a day. On average, it takes about 1700-2000 steps to travel one mile, depending on your stride length. To measure your stride, mark a distance of 50 feet. Now walk this distance and count your steps. Divide 50 by the number of steps and that is your stride length. Now, divide 5280 by your stride length to find your average steps per mile.

Read your Training Handbook and view our suggested 24-week training schedule. If you can currently walk three miles comfortably, you can follow this schedule as it appears. If you cannot currently walk three miles then start with one mile, build up over the next two weeks to a three-mile walk and then join the program. If you can walk much further than three miles then you can skip down the program or wait until the program catches up with you.